the original RIAA gold standard was based on units of one million

THE ORIGINAL RIAA GOLD RECORDS were introduced in 1958, and there were only two awards: a Gold Record for singles, and a Gold Record for LPs. To qualify, a single must have sold a minimum of one million (1,000,000) copies, while an LP album must have sold one million dollars ($1,000,000) at the manufacturer’s wholesale price. There were no “unit” sales required for LP certification, and there were no Platinum Record Awards. The Record Industry Association of America (originally R.I.A.A., now the periodless RIAA) stepped in to offer independently audited and certified ‘official’ awards in place of the common awards made by individual record… Continue Reading the original RIAA gold standard was based on units of one million

moody blue – facts and fallacies about elvis’ final album as a collector’s item

AUGUST 16, 1977, WAS THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL: Elvis Presley died. Very few fans were aware of his deteriorating health and we were unprepared for our own response to his death. Fans were aware of Elvis in general: his latest album, MOODY BLUE, had been released four weeks earlier and was selling better than usual. In the months after his death, his final album became one of his best selling albums ever. Due it being his final album, MOODY BLUE holds a special place in the Elvis canon, despite it’s being a relatively undistinguished album, even by Presley’s flagging efforts… Continue Reading moody blue – facts and fallacies about elvis’ final album as a collector’s item

about those electronically reprocessed stereo albums

WHAT IS ELECTRONICALLY REPROCESSED STEREO and why do so many Elvis fans hate it? What is rechanneled stereo and Duophonic stereo and why does everyone else hate them? Before addressing these questions, I want to mention a few things about stereo records. Most people, including music historians and record collectors, simply take stereo for granted—but it has a lengthy and interesting past. In 1957, the stereo long-playing album was introduced to the marketplace by a pair of small independent record companies. In 1958, most of the major companies followed with their own stereo releases. By 1959, the new format was… Continue Reading about those electronically reprocessed stereo albums

another mess of blues with wikipedia and elvis

A MESS OF BLUES seems to be the song that sums up many of the entries on Wikipedia for rock & roll in general and Elvis Presley in particular. Their article on the soundtrack album for the 1968 NBC-TV Special ELVIS is so error-ridden as to be not only not useful, but to be downright harmful! It’s yet another mess of blues about Elvis on Wiki. And it’s amazing how much misinformation the Wiki writers can slip into a few paragraphs about a topic that involves popular music of the past sixty years. In many fields, Wiki is often spot on… Continue Reading another mess of blues with wikipedia and elvis

facts and fallacies about elvis’ gold records volume 4

IN FEBRUARY 1968, RCA Victor issued ELVIS’ GOLD RECORDS VOLUME 4, the first compilation of million-sellers by Elvis in five years. Or, at least they were supposed to be million-sellers, but only half the album consisted of genuine gold record hits. The whys and wherefores for this are filled with fallacies and misconceptions that began with the album’s release. This album was not greeted with warmth by reviewers or the record-buying public. This new album closely followed Presley’s latest single, Guitar Man, which had been released a few weeks earlier. While hardly a straight-ahead rock & roller, this was a sort of countrified blues… Continue Reading facts and fallacies about elvis’ gold records volume 4