the elvis presley gold standard 45s part 3 (1958–1965)

IN LATE 1958, THE GOLD STANDARD SERIES of 45 rpm singles was released by RCA Victor in the US market. While it was never stated as such, the series seems to have been launched solely to keep Elvis Presley records in print. The Gold Standard 45s looked identical to the company’s regular catalog 45s: they had glossy black labels with “RCA Victor” on top at 12 o’clock with Nipper-and-gramophone just below it.

This is the third of eight articles that provides collectors with the most complete and accurate discography and price guide to Elvis’ Gold Standard 45s and picture sleeves on the Internet!

These are often abbreviated as “DOT” (dog on top). These records did not have GOLD STANDARD printed on the label. Therefore the only way to recognize them was their catalog numbers: rather than the ’47’ prefix common to the regular 45 rpm singles, these GS 45s had a ‘447’ prefix.

Determining rarity of each title is difficult: the big hits of the ’50s would have had the largest press runs on the original DOT label. Therefore there may have been plenty of those sitting around in stores and warehouses and therefore less demand for them on the new DOS label.

Hence the biggest hits could have had the smallest pressings on any given variation. The only way we will know short of someone turning up RCA’s files of record orders for the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s is through the prices realized during public auctions. This will take a looooooooooong time.

Indianapolis pressings may be the only pressings

Indianapolis pressings may be the only pressings most of the Gold Standards most of the time, but not all of the time. Since the beginning, RCA’s Indianapolis plant manufactured the vast majority of GS 45s. These Indianapolis records are easily recognized: by the matrix numbers are machine-stamped into the trail-off area (the dead wax around the label).

There should also be a capital ‘I’ with serifs (referred to as a cross-beam ‘I’) stamped into the same area, but this marking can be difficult to see in some light.

Those known pressings are listed beneath the record titles and is preceded by a bullet (•). The ‘S’ numbers in parentheses at the end of each line is the stamper numbers found in the trail-off vinyl of each side of the record.

•  These records can be found with and without the recording date printed on the left side. The date may be the month/day/year or just the year.

•  All 1958 and early 1959 pressings have Camden, NJ, in the lower right perimeter print. Records without this address were manufactured after mid-1959.

This is one of several articles with discographies and current market values to be found on the A Touch Of Gold website; refer to the postscript below for more information on the the other articles.


[one_fourth]Elvis_GS_0601_dot_cs_150[/one_fourth][one_fourth]Elvis_GS_0652_dos_cs_150[/one_fourth][one_fourth]Elvis_GS_0605_orange_cs_150[/one_fourth][one_fourth_last]Elvis_GS_0617_red_cs_150[/one_fourth_last]

Gold Standard company sleeves

For decades, record companies used paper sleeves to hold their product so that records did not get scratched, marred, or otherwise damaged in transit, when stocked, or while handled by would-be buyers. Plain white or brown paper sleeves were the most common, but many companies had their own brand-name sleeves printed.

These could be of various colors and always carried the company name and maybe a logo or an eye-catching design. But these paper sleeves but they did not identify the individual record within!

Record collectors refer to these as factory sleeves and manufacturers sleeves but most often as company sleeves. For more detailed information on RCA Gold Standard company sleeves, refer to The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 2 here on Elvis – A Touch Of Gold.



 
 

Elvis_GS_cs1a

Elvis_GS_cs2a

Elvis_GS_cs1b

Company sleeve design 1

This is the company sleeve that first appeared with the original Gold Standard releases in 1958. Therefore, it is the most important sleeve to any Elvis Presley Gold Standard collection: every GS 45 in your collection from 447-0600 through as late as 447-06246 should be accompanied by one of these sleeves!

There are two variations on this sleeve: one is cut straight the across the top on the front and back (top image above). The other is cut straight on the back but is notched in the front (middle image above). The back is the same for both (bottom image above).

These DOT records can be found with later sleeves, as there was years of overlapping. But for the perfect collection, each GS 45 should be housed in a company sleeve that was manufactured at the same time as the record.

A tip for collectors

All Gold Standard company sleeves were made equal: these sleeves were used with GS 45s by other RCA artists, most of whom are not very collectable. Should you be flipping through stacks of 45s and come across a Gold Standard record by other artists in NM sleeves and the seller wants a couple of quarters for the record, buy it! The sleeve can be removed and used to replace an anomalous sleeve on one of the Presley platters in your collection.

Assigning the values

Each record below is assigned a value for the record in near mint condition. Here, NM means that the labels and the vinyl on both sides of the record are almost ‘like new.’ The assigned value for most records has a generous spread to allow for the diversity in the prices paid for these records on the Internet, where many sellers are clueless about grading a record correctly.

The high number in the assigned values more accurately reflects rarity, while the low number reflects what these records might be purchased for on the Internet.

If I am correct, the high number in the assigned values more accurately reflects rarity and real value—and what these records might fetch when sold by a knowledgeable dealer to a knowledgeable collector.

The low number reflects what these records might be purchased for when sold by someone not aware of the record’s actual worth. (That is, a non-knowledgeable dealer, which is most of the sellers on the Internet.)

The numbers were arrived at by hours of research on the Internet, primarily the Popsike, Collectors Frenzy and Gripsweat websites. My own ‘common sense’ based on forty years of activity in buying and selling records and writing about buying and selling records also came into play.

Please note that copies of these records in less than NM condition usually sell for significantly lower prices. For records in VG+ condition, start at half the value of a NM copy and work down from there.

Copies of most numbers in VG condition have little value.

Man of these numbers with an black RCA-on-the-right label are rather rare records. Some of the harder-to-find numbers (and they may be the big hits or the not-so-big hits) are probably undervalued below . . .

The images of the records

I don’t own the records that are illustrated below. I pulled these images off the Internet, hence the variable quality of those images.

They are placed in the discography below to break up the monotony of the list, although each image is can be found near its listing.

And now for the discography

The discography and price guide section that follows should be self-explanatory. I assume that most readers have seen and used some form of price guide for some sort of collectable. Since I know that I should never assume anything, let’s take a quick walk through it anyway.

The records are listed in chronological order based on the catalog numbers. Each listing has three lines of information:

•  Line 1 has the catalog number followed by the titles of the two songs on the record.

•  Line 2 notes that it is in fact an black label with “RCA Victor” on the right side, which is followed by the assigned value.

•  Line 3 notes that the record was pressed at Indianapolis and is identified as such by machine-stamped numbers in the trail-off vinyl. Each line ends with two sets of figures separated by a forward slash (/): these are the stamper-numbers (or ‘S’ numbers for RCA) that were usually machine-stamped into the trail-off area indicating the ‘parts’ used to press the records. 

I again have to assume that all the numbers below were made in Indianapolis—records pressed elsewhere would be rare indeed. Any record with engraved or etched numbers in the trail-off area probably indicate another pressing plant’s product. These would probably be rather rare records and I would certainly appreciate your notifying me of their existence . . .




1958


Elvis_GS_0600_dot500

This is the first Elvis Gold Standard number (447 -0600, I Forgot To Remember To Forget / Mystery Train) as it would have appeared in record stores around the country in 1958–59 in a gold company paper sleeve.


447 -0600     I Forgot To Remember To Forget / Mystery Train
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $    30–40
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (2S-A1/1S-A1).


447 -0601     That’s All Right / Blue Moon Of Kentucky
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                      $    25–50
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (3S/3S).


447 -0602     Good Rocking Tonight / I Don’t Care If The Sun Don’t Shine
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $    2550
                       • Hollywood pressing with a capital ‘H’ in the trail-off area, 45 R.P.M. on one line, and “I Don’t Care If The / Sun Don’t Shine” on two lines (3S/3S).

                       • Hollywood pressing with a capital ‘H’ in the trail-off area, and “I Don’t Care / If The Sun Don’t Shine” on two lines (7S/7S).
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area, regular print, 45 RPM on two lines, and “I Don’t Care If The Sun Don’t Shine” on one line (?S/?S).
                       • Rockaway pressing with a capital ‘R’ in the trail-off vinyl, regular print, 45 RPM on two lines, and “I Don’t Care / If The Sun Don’t Shine” on two lines (4S-A1/4S-A1).

     NOTE: The Hollywood pressing with the line break after “Care” (7S/7S) is an early ’60s pressing. (Frank Daniels)


Elvis_GS_0603_dot500

As either a 78 or a 45 on either Sun or RCA and even as a Gold Standard reissue, Milkcow Blues Boogie / You’re A Heartbreaker is always the most difficult of Presley’s first five records to find. Consequently, I have assigned it a rather high value: in the past ten years, only five copies 447-0603 have sold at auction on eBay, and only one of them was a DOT pressing.


447 -0603     Milkcow Blues Boogie / You’re A Heartbreaker
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $    3060
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (2S-A1/3S).


447 -0604     Baby, Let’s Play House / I’m Left, You’re Right, She’s Gone
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $    25–50
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (2S/3S).


447 -0605     Heartbreak Hotel / I Was The One
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                        $    15–30
                        • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (1S/1S).
     
                   • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (1S-A1/2S-A1).


447 -0607     I Want You, I Need You, I Love You / My Baby Left Me
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                        $    1530
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (2S/1S).


447 -0608     Hound Dog / Don’t Be Cruel
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $    15–30
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (2S-A1/2S).


447 -0609     Blue Suede Shoes / Tutti Frutti
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $    20–40
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (2S-A/1S-A1).


Elvis_GS_0610_dot500

447-0610 is among the rarest of the GS 45s issued prior to the orange label pressings of 1969! It is so rare is this record that no copies have been sold at auction on eBay in ten years!


447 -0610     I Got A Woman / I’m Counting On You
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                     $    50–100
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (1S/1S).


447 -0611     I’ll Never Let You Go (Little Darlin’) / I’m Gonna Sit Right Down And Cry (Over You)
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                      $     30–60
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (1S/2S-A1).


447 -0612     Tryin’ To Get To You / I Love You Because
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                      $  50–100
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (1S/1S).


447 -0613     Blue Moon / Just Because
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                      $     20–40
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (2S-A1/3S).


447 -0614     Money Honey / One Sided Love Affair
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                      $     30–60
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (1S-A1/2S-A1).


447 -0615     Shake, Rattle And Roll / Lawdy, Miss Clawdy
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $     15–30
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (2S-A1/1S).
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (3S/3S).


447 -0616     Love Me Tender / Any Way You Want Me (That’s How I Will Be)
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $     15–30
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (1S/2S-A1).


       

447 -0617     Too Much / Playing For Keeps
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $     15–30
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (1S/2S).
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (2S/1S).


447 -0618     All Shook Up / That’s When Your Heartaches Begin
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $     15–30
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area, and small, tight “45 RPM” on two lines. The recording date is approximately one-half-inch (½”) below the catalog number (2S/2S-A1).
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area, and bold, loose “45 R P M” on two lines. The recording date is approximately one-half-inch (⅛”) below the catalog number (?S/?S).

      NOTE: The pressing of 0618 with the bold “45” is not a first pressing from 1959. It is actually a separate issue pressed no earlier than the beginning of 1960. (Frank Daniels)



SOLICITATION: The pressings of each record are listed below the song titles. Each begins with a bullet (•) and ends two sets of ‘stamper numbers’ in parentheses (the ‘S’ numbers). Almost all are from RCA’s Indianapolis plant. Should you own other pressings, please consider sharing the information with me. Send new information to the Comments sections below with the stamper numbers in the order that I have the sides listed, and whether there is an ‘H’ or an ‘I’ or an “R” in the trail-off area.



1959


447 -0619     Jailhouse Rock / Treat Me Nice
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $     15–30
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (15S/15S-A1).


447 -0620     (Let Me Be Your) Teddy Bear / Loving You
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $     15–30
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (10S/9S).


447 -0621     Don’t / I Beg Of You
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $     15–30
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (5S-A1C/2S-AC).


447 -0622     Wear My Ring Around Your Neck / Doncha’ Thinks It’s Time
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $     15–30
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (2S-A4/1S-B1).
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (12S/12S).


447 -0623     Hard Headed Woman/ Don’t Ask Me Why
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $     15–30
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (1S-A1/1S-A1).
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (10S/10S).


447 -0624     I Got Stung / One Night
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $     15–30
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (10S/3S-A3).
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (11S/3S-A5).


Elvis_GS_0626_dot copy

Stuck On You / Fame And Fortune is a personal fave among all of the Elvis records. Aside from the excellence of the performance on each recording (and I think that Fame And Fortune is an under-appreciated masterpiece) this was one of the first records that Aunt Judy gave me from her collection when I was 10-years old.

 

1960

447 -0625     (Now And Then There’s) A Fool Such As I / I Need Your Love Tonight
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $     15–30
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (9S/9S).


1962


447 -0626     A Big Hunk O’ Love / My Wish Came True
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $     15–30
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (9S/10S)*.


447 -0627     Stuck On You / Fame And Fortune
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $     20–40
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (23S/23S).
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (23S/24S).


447 -0628     It’s Now Or Never / A Mess Of Blues
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $     1020
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (10S-A6/1S).
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (10S-A6/2S-A6).


447 -0629     Are You Lonesome Tonight / I Gotta Know
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                      $     1020
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (1S-B2/3S-A6).
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (1S-B2/3S-A7).


447 -0630     Surrender / Lonely Man
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                      $     1020
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (3S-A3/1S-A5).


447 -0631     I Feel So Bad / Wild In The Country
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                     $     20–40
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (2S-A6/3S).


447 -0634     Little Sister / (Marie’s The Name) His Latest Flame
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $     15–30
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (?S/?S)


447 -0635     Can’t Help Falling In Love / Rock-A-Hula Baby
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $     1020
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (?S/?S).


447 -0636     Good Luck Charm / Anything That’s Part Of You
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                      $     20–40
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (4S/4S)*.



VALUES FOR LOWER GRADES: The values listed here are for records with both the labels and the vinyl in near mint condition (NM). Records in lower grades are worth considerably less: a record graded VG+ would be worth less than half of the NM value.



1963

447 -0637     She’s Not You / Just Tell Her Jim Said Hello
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                      $     25–50
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (?S/?S).


447 -0638     Return To Sender / Where Do You Come From
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                      $     1020
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (4S-B4/4S-B2).


1964

Elvis_GS_0639_ps3

447-0639 was the first Elvis Gold Standard original, pairing two sides previously unreleased on a single. Both of these tracks were pulled from the POT LUCK album of 1962. This was also the first GS 45 issued with a picture sleeve, one of five such sleeves issued for the 1964 Summer Special. (Refer to The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 4)


Elvis_GS_0639_wlp_B_2

Suspicion was one of Presley’s finest recordings of the early ’60s. Why it hadn’t been selected as a single in 1962 or ’63 is unknown. A soundalike version by Terry Stafford was released in early 1964, peaking at #3 on Cash Box. This inspired RCA to issue Elvis’s version as a GS 45.


Elvis_GS_0639_wlp_B

The promo at the top is from Hollywood: note “ELVIS PRESLEY with The Jordanaires” above the spindle hole and “NOT FOR SALE” on one line on the right. The bottom promo is from Rockaway: the artist credit is below the hole and “NOT FOR SALE” is on two lines.


447 -0639     Kiss Me Quick / Suspicion
                        White label promo with “RCA Victor” on top                                          $     30–60
                       • Hollywood pressing with “Elvis Presley” below the spindle hole (4S/4S).
                       • Rockaway pressing with “Elvis Presley” above the spindle hole (?S/?S).
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                       $     1020
                       • Hollywood pressing with a capital ‘H’ in the trail-off area (4S/4S).
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (3S-A1/3S-A3).
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (3S-A2/3S-A1).
                       • Rockaway pressing with an “R” in the trail-off area (1S-A2/2S-B2).
                       • Rockaway pressing with an “R” in the trail-off area (1S-A2/2S-C1).

                        Full color picture sleeve                                                                                $     3570


447 -0640     One Broken Heart For Sale / They Remind Me Too Much Of You
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                      $     25–50
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (4S-B2/4S-B1).


447 -0641     (You’re The) Devil In Disguise / Please Don’t Drag That Skin Around
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                      $     25–50
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (5S-A3/13S-A4).


447 -0642     Bossa Nova Baby / Witchcraft
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                      $     25–50
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (4S-B1/3S-A1).


Elvis_GS_0720_ps

447-0720 was the second Elvis Gold Standard original with two sides that had not been released previously on a single in the US. It was in print for short time, and in 1965, Blue Christmas was coupled with the more appropriate Santa Claus Is Back In Town and issued as 447-0647. Note that this sleeve makes it clear that Blue Christmas was the featured side.


Elvis_GS_0720_psB

Wooden Heart had been a #1 record when issued as a single in the UK and Germany in 1961. Alas, the powers-that-be ruled that it was not to be issued as a single in the States, although it would turn up twice as a Gold Standard B-side! This was the only Presley GS 45 released in the 0700 series. (Why?)


Elvis_GS_0720_wlp_H

Elvis_GS_0720_wlp_I

White label promos: the pressing op top is from Hollywood, the pressing on the bottom from Indianapolis.


Elvis_GS_0720_Holly

This is the Hollywood pressing of 447-0720: note that 45 R.P.M. on the right side is on one line with three periods in the abbreviation, with “NEW ORTHOPHONIC” HIGH FIDELITY below it. There is no mention of the side’s recording date.


Elvis_GS_0720_Indian

This is the Indianapolis pressing: note that 45 RPM on the right side is on two lines without periods, and the complete recording date is on the left side. There is no “NEW ORTHOPHONIC” HIGH FIDELITY anywhere. This Indianapolis pressing is far more common than the Hollywood record, yet few dealers or collectors have noticed this and the values for each are identical.

NOTE: When describing a record for sale, it is important to mention a sticker affixed to a label, or even a stain left by the removal of a sticker from a label. Basically, anything on the label or the record that wasn’t part of the manufacturing process needs to be noted.


447 -0720     Blue Christmas / Wooden Heart
                        White label promo with “RCA Victor” on top                                            $   40–80
                       • Hollywood pressing with “Not For Sale” on two lines (4S/6S).
                       • Rockaway pressing with “Not For Sale” on one line (2S/2S).
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                     $      15–30
                       • Hollywood pressing with a capital ‘H’ in the trail-off area (6S/6S).
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (?S/?S).

                        Full color picture sleeve                                                                               $      3570

 

1965

Elvis_GS_0646_dot2

447-0644 is one of three Gold Standard numbers released in early 1965 with the DOT label. Each is rare, although most dealers and collectors have yet to realize exactly how rare they are! This pressing of 447-0644 is among the rarest and most valuable number in the Gold Standard Series.


447 -0643     Crying In The Chapel / I Believe In The Man In The Sky
                        NOTE: The catalog number indicates that RCA planned on issuing this either 1) for the Christmas season of 1964, or 2) early in ’65. Crying In The Chapel was an unreleased side from four years earlier while the B-side had been on the HIS HAND IN MINE album of 1961. For unknown reasons, 447-0643 was not released until the Easter season of 1965, and is listed in The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 5.


447 -0644     Kissin’ Cousins / It Hurts Me
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                     $ 100–200
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (5S-B2/8S-A1).


Elvis_GS_0645_dot

One of the three Gold Standard numbers released in early 1965 with the DOT label, 447-0645 appears to be the easiest of the three to find.


447 -0645     Such A Night / Never Ending
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                      $   40–80
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (4S-A2/4S-A4).
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (4S-A3/4S-A4).


447 -0646     Viva Las Vegas / What’d I Say
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on top                                                  $ 250–500
                       • Indianapolis pressing with a capital ‘I’ in the trail-off area (4S-A6/4S-A3).

                        NOTE: Based on the sole eBay sale of 2013 (below), the assigned value here may be a very conservative estimate indeed.

 

Elvis_GS_0646_dot

Is 447-0646 with the DOT label the rarest Elvis Gold Standard record and perhaps the most valuable Gold Standard record in the world? The only copy of this record auctioned on eBay in the past ten years sold for $775 in 2013. So the answer appears to be ‘Yes’ to both questions. 


Elvis_GS_header_3

HEADER IMAGE: While Bill Haley was touring Europe, Elvis dropped in a shows in Frankfort and Stuttgart. This backstage photo shows an animated looking Haley and a more subdued looking Presley. The tour was a bit of a disaster for Haley, who remained popular in Europe into the ’70s, long past the point where he could command any attention in his home country.


Elvis_GoldSuit_1959

Postscriptually, “The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 3 (1958–1965)” is the third of a planned eight articles addressing the complete run of Gold Standard singles as collectable records. When it is completed, I will include a list of the articles with hyperlinks here at the bottom of each article for easy access.

Now, here are all the articles on the Elvis Gold Standard 45s listed in the suggested reading order:

1The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 1 (Foreword)

2The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 2 (Company Sleeves)

3The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 3 (1958–1965) 

4The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 4 (1964)

5. The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 5 (1965-1968)

6. Those Bloody Rare Orange Label Gold Standard 45s

7. The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 6 (1969)

8. The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 7 (1969–1976)

9. The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 8 (1976–2000)


 
 

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