the elvis presley gold standard 45s part 5 (1965-1968)

I1965, THE GOLD STANDARD SERIES label was changed for the first time. The labels remained an attractive glossy black, but “RCA Victor” was moved to the right side of the spindle hole while Nipper was placed on the left side. Again, there was no mention of “Gold Standard” anywhere on the label; only the 447 prefix identified these records as reissues.

These records did not have “Gold Standard” printed on the label; only those who recognized the ‘447’ prefix knew that the records were reissues.

This is the fifth of eight articles that provides collectors with the most complete and accurate discography and price guide to Elvis’ Gold Standard 45s and picture sleeves on the Internet!

These are often abbreviated as “DOS” (dog on side). Some of these may have been issued in the latter part of 1964 but I have listed them all with initial dates of 1965 to avoid confusion.

Determining rarity of each title is difficult: the big hits of the ’50s would have had the largest press runs on the original DOT label. Therefore there may have been plenty of those sitting around in stores and warehouses and therefore less demand for them on the new DOS label.

Hence the biggest hits could have had the smallest pressings on any given variation. The only way we will know short of someone turning up RCA’s files of record orders for the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s is through the prices realized during public auctions. This will take a looooooooooong time.

This is one of several articles with discographies and current market values to be found on the A Touch Of Gold website; refer to the postscript below for more information on the the other articles.


[one_fourth]Elvis_GS_0601_dot_cs_150[/one_fourth][one_fourth]Elvis_GS_0652_dos_cs_150[/one_fourth][one_fourth]Elvis_GS_0605_orange_cs_150[/one_fourth][one_fourth_last]Elvis_GS_0617_red_cs_150[/one_fourth_last]

Indianapolis pressings may be the only pressings

Indianapolis pressings may be the only pressings most of the Gold Standards most of the time, but not all of the time. Since the beginning, RCA’s Indianapolis plant manufactured the vast majority of GS 45s. These Indianapolis records are easily recognized: by the matrix numbers are machine-stamped into the trail-off area (the dead wax around the label).

There should also be a capital ‘I’ with serifs (referred to as a cross-beam ‘I’) stamped into the same area, but this marking can be difficult to see in some light.


Elvis_GS_0645_dot

Elvis_GS_0616_dos

On top is the previous look for their Gold Standard series: black label with “RCA Victor” and Nipper on the side. Below is the new look that greeted record buyers in 1968. I did not see the change until October of that year when I duly (no, anxiously) purchased If I Can Dream, the first Elvis single to excite me in years!

RCA’s basic label template

The basic label template that RCA shipped to the regional printers that worked with their pressing plants had only three bits of information:

•  “RCA VICTOR” in plain white letters (Helvetica?) on the right side beginning at approximately 2:30 o’clock.

•  Nipper and the phonograph are on the left side beginning at approximately 9 o’clock.

•  “TMK(s)” and other trademark information in tiny type on two lines laid across the bottom of the label.

Every label has that information in the same style and in the same places. These labels were shipped to the regional printers who worked with RCA’s plants. The rest of the label data was set by these local shops working with RCA instructions on the rest of the layout:

•  The song title (all caps)with the songwriter’s credit (upper and lowercase) were in plain black block type above the spindle hole.

•  The artist’s name in the same type was below the spindle hole but above the TMK(s) data.

•  On the left side, the catalog number was above Nipper while the matrix number was below.

•  On the right side, “45 RPM” was above “RCA VICTOR.”

The variations on RCA-on-right label 1 and RCA-on-right label 2 all take place on the right side of the spindle hole below “Victor.”

RCA-on-right label 1: without publishing data

This label 1 can also be called the simple version due to its having less information than label 2. There is one bit of information on one line on the left side below Nipper: 1) the matrix number. (The recording date may be on the right side of the spindle hole or the left, but it is not a part of the info bits below Nipper.) Like so:

[matrix number]

Elvis_GS_0605_dos

Elvis_GS_0609_dos

Note that this simple label design with just the matrix number on the left side below Nipper can be found with the recording date on the left side below Nipper (above top) or on the right side below RCA VICTOR (above bottom).

RCA-on-right label 2: with publishing data

This label 2 can also be called the complex version due to its having more information than label 1. There is three bits of information on at least four lines on the left side below Nipper: 1) the publisher, 2) the matrix number, and 3) the side’s running time. Like so:

[publishing data]
[matrix number]
[time]

Elvis_GS_0646_dos_A

Note that this complex label design may or may not have the recording date be on the left side of the spindle hole below the publishing data and the time, or on the right below RCA VICTOR.

A few more discrepancies

There are several other discrepancies with black RCA-on-the-right (dog-on-side) label GS 45s for which I have not found a pattern. As noted, copies may be found with or without a recording date above the spindle hole. The date may be the month, day, and year or simply the year. That seems to be the biggest variation.

Designated promos

RCA did not designate stock copies for promotional use in the ’60s. Any copies found with the tiny white NOT FOR SALE sticker would almost certainly be copies found somewhere and the sticker applied ten or more years later.

Gold Standard company sleeves

Each GS 45 was shipped in a protective paper sleeve. These sleeves may have been plain white or brown paper with no print whatsoever; this was the most inexpensive way to go and every record company used such sleeves.

My own common sense based on forty years of buying and selling records and writing about buying and selling records came into play when assigning the values.

The record companies also had specially manufactured sleeves that featured the record company’s name, often with a logo or an eye-catching design. These generic sleeves did not identify individual records by having titles or catalog numbers printed on them!

That is, these sleeves merely identified the record within as company product without specifying what the individual product was. Record collectors refer to these by several terms:

•  manufacturers sleeves
•  factory sleeves
•  company sleeves

These are effectively synonymous terms but it is company sleeves that I favor and use exclusively in my articles on record collecting.

For the Perfect Elvis Collection, each GS 45 should be housed in a GS sleeve manufactured at the time for use with that record. Of course, overlapping of older sleeves with newer records was common with the Gold Standards, but that should not stop a collector from seeking out the correct sleeve for each record in his collection.

For this article, I am listing those sleeves that were manufactured contemporaneously with the black label records listed below. For more information on all Gold Standard company sleeves, refer to “elvis gold standard 45s part 2.”


Elvis_GS_cs1a

Elvis_GS_cs2a

Elvis_GS_cs1b

Company sleeve design 1

This is the company sleeve that first appeared with the original Gold Standard releases in 1959. Therefore, it is the most important sleeve to any Elvis Presley Gold Standard collection: every GS in your collection from 1959 through 1965 (0600–0650) should be accompanied by one of these sleeves!

Further research may extend this to where it is suggested that every GS record with black labels with RCA Victor at the top record (0625–0646) be accompanied by one of these sleeves.

There are two variations on this sleeve: one is cut straight the across the top on the front and back (top image above). The other is cut straight on the back but is notched in the front (middle image above). The back is the same for both (bottom image above).


Elvis_GS_cs3a

Elvis_GS_cs_1965c

Elvis_GS_cs3b

Company sleeve design 2

This sleeve design came into play sometime in the early to mid-’60s, but I am uncertain of what year. RCA made a major change in the company sleeves for their regular catalog 45s: in 1965 or ’66, they switched from an old-fashioned layout with serif typeface (or ‘font’ to most computer users) to a more modern design with sans serif face.

This alteration is reflected on the GS sleeve here: the older layout with serif fonts on design 1 was replaced with a much more modern look featuring sans serif type on design 2. This move may have occurred simultaneously with the label change in the records in 1965: the “RCA Victor” logo along with Nipper were moved from the top of the black labels to the right and left sides, respectively.

If that is so, we can assume that they were intended to accompany those GS titles issued from 1965 on (the dog-on-side numbers). This was the design that ran through 1973; therefore, every GS in your collection from 1965 through ’73 (0625–0685) should be accompanied by one of these sleeves!

But any guess on when the change was made for the Gold Standard design is just that—a guess.

There are two variations on this sleeve: sleeves can be found with the paper on the inside the same yellow color as the paper on the outside (bottom image above), or with white paper insides (middle image above).

A tip for collectors

All Gold Standard company sleeves were made equal: these sleeves were used with GS 45s by other RCA artists, most of whom are not very collectable. Should you be flipping through stacks of 45s and come across a Gold Standard record by other artists in NM sleeves and the seller wants a couple of quarters for the record, buy it! The sleeve can be removed and used to replace an anomalous sleeve on one of the Presley platters in your collection.

Assigning the values

Each record below is assigned a value for the record in near mint condition. Here, NM means that the labels and the vinyl on both sides of the record are almost ‘like new.’ The assigned value for most records has a generous spread to allow for the diversity in the prices paid for these records on the Internet, where many sellers are clueless about grading a record correctly.

The high number in the assigned values more accurately reflects rarity, while the low number reflects what these records might be purchased for on the Internet.

If I am correct, the high number in the assigned values more accurately reflects rarity and real value—and what these records might fetch when sold by a knowledgeable dealer to a knowledgeable collector.

The low number reflects what these records might be purchased for when sold by someone not aware of the record’s actual worth. (That is, a non-knowledgeable dealer, which is most of the sellers on the Internet.)

The numbers were arrived at by hours of research on the Internet, primarily the Popsike, Collectors Frenzy and Gripsweat websites. My own ‘common sense’ based on forty years of activity in buying and selling records and writing about buying and selling records also came into play.

Please note that copies of these records in less than NM condition usually sell for significantly lower prices. For records in VG+ condition, start at half the value of a NM copy and work down from there.

Copies of most numbers in VG condition have little value.

Man of these numbers with an black RCA-on-the-right label are rather rare records. Some of the harder-to-find numbers (and they may be the big hits or the not-so-big hits) are probably undervalued below . . .

The images of the records

I don’t own the records that are illustrated below. I pulled these images off the Internet, hence the variable quality of those images.

They are placed in the discography below to break up the monotony of the list, although each image is can be found near its listing.

And now for the discography

The discography and price guide section that follows should be self-explanatory. I assume that most readers have seen and used some form of price guide for some sort of collectable. Since I know that I should never assume anything, let’s take a quick walk through it anyway.

The records are listed in chronological order based on the catalog numbers. Each listing has three lines of information:

•  Line 1 has the catalog number followed by the titles of the two songs on the record.

•  Line 2 notes that it is in fact an black label with “RCA Victor” on the right side, which is followed by the assigned value.

•  Line 3 notes that the record was pressed at Indianapolis and is identified as such by machine-stamped numbers in the trail-off vinyl. Each line ends with two sets of figures separated by a forward slash (/): these are the stamper-numbers (or ‘S’ numbers for RCA) that were usually machine-stamped into the trail-off area indicating the ‘parts’ used to press the records. 

I again have to assume that all the numbers below were made in Indianapolis—records pressed elsewhere would be rare indeed. Any record with engraved or etched numbers in the trail-off area probably indicate another pressing plant’s product. These would probably be rather rare records and I would certainly appreciate your notifying me of their existence . . .




1965

Elvis_GS_0605_dos

447-0600     I Forgot To Remember To Forget / Mystery Train
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                      $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S/3S).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S/3S).


447-0601     That’s All Right / Blue Moon Of Kentucky
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S/6S).


447-0602     Good Rocking Tonight / I Don’t Care If The Sun Don’t Shine
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (8S/5S).


447-0603     Milkcow Blues Boogie / You’re A Heartbreaker
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                      $   20–40
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (2S-A1/3S).



VALUES FOR LOWER GRADES: The values listed here are for records with labels and vinyl in near mint condition (NM). Records in a lower grade condition are worth considerably less: a record graded VG+ might be worth approximately one-half (40-50%) of the listed value. A record in VG condition might be worth no more than one-fifth (10-20%) of the listed value. 



447-0604     Baby, Let’s Play House / I’m Left, You’re Right, She’s Gone
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                     $   20–40
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (2S/3S-A1).


447-0605     Heartbreak Hotel / I Was The One
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (1S-A1/2S-A1).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S/2S-A1).


447-0607     I Want You, I Need You, I Love You / My Baby Left Me
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                      $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S/2S).


447-0608     Hound Dog / Don’t Be Cruel
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (6S/7S)*.


Elvis_GS_0609_dos

While Steve Sholes of RCA kept his promise to Sam Philips not to release Blue Suede Shoes as a single in the US. In several countries where Sun Records had little or no representation, RCA did release it as the second Presley single (after Heartbreak Hotel) with Tutti Frutti as the flip-side. In several countries, it was a double-sided Top 10 hit for Elvis. In Italy, Tutti Frutti reached #1 while Blue Suede Shoes peaked at #2!


447-0609     Blue Suede Shoes / Tutti Frutti
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S-A/2S-A1).


447-0610     I Got A Woman / I’m Counting On You
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $      ___

                       NOTE: The existence of this record is unverified; there is no assigned value.


447-0611     I’ll Never Let You Go (Little Darlin’) / I’m Gonna Sit Right Down And Cry (Over You)
                     Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                      $       ___

                      NOTE: The existence of this record is unverified; there is no assigned value.


447-0612     Tryin’ To Get To You / I Love You Because
                     Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                      $       ___

                      NOTE: The existence of this record is unverified; there is no assigned value.


447-0613     Blue Moon / Just Because
                     Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                        $   15–30
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (2S-A1/4S).


447-0614     Money Honey / One Sided Love Affair
                     Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $    15–30
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (1S-A1/5S).


447-0615     Shake, Rattle And Roll / Lawdy, Miss Clawdy
                     Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S/4S).


Elvis_GS_0616_dos

447-0616     Love Me Tender / Any Way You Want Me (That’s How I Will Be)
                     Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (2S/2S).
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (2S/2S-A3).


447-0617     Too Much / Playing For Keeps
                     Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                        $   15–30
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S/2S).


447-0618     All Shook Up / That’s When Your Heartaches Begin
                     Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (2S-A1/2S-A1).


447-0619     Jailhouse Rock / Treat Me Nice
                     Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (16S/16S).
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (17S/16S).


447-0620     (Let Me Be Your) Teddy Bear / Loving You
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                        $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (10S/13S).


447-0621     Don’t / I Beg Of You
                     Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                        $   15–30
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S/15S).


447-0622     Wear My Ring Around Your Neck / Doncha Thinks It’s Time
                     Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (13S/14S).


447-0623     Hard Headed Woman/ Don’t Ask Me Why
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (11S/10S)*.


447-0624     I Got Stung / One Night
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (11S/3S-A5).


447-0625     (Now And Then There’s) A Fool Such As I / I Need Your Love Tonight
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (9S/9S).


447-0626     A Big Hunk O’ Love / My Wish Came True
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (9S/10S).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (10S/10S).


447-0627     Stuck On You / Fame And Fortune
                     Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                        $   15–30
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (23S/24S)*.


Elvis_GS_0629_dos_A

Elvis_GS_0629_dos_B

447-0628     It’s Now Or Never / A Mess Of Blues
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                        $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (18S/11S-A1).


447-0629     Are You Lonesome Tonight / I Gotta Know
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (1S-B2/3S-A7).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S/3S-A7).


447-0630     Surrender / Lonely Man
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S-A3/1S-A5).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (12S/1S-A5).


447-0631     I Feel So Bad / Wild In The Country
                     Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                        $   15–30
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (1S-A5/3S).
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (1S-A5/5S).


447-0634     Little Sister / (Marie’s The Name) His Latest Flame
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                      $   20–40
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-A1/4S-A1).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-A3/4S-B2).


447-0635     Can’t Help Falling In Love / Rock-A-Hula Baby
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-A3/5S-A5).


447-0636     Good Luck Charm / Anything That’s Part Of You
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-B1/4S-A4).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-B4/4S-A4).



SOLICITATION: The pressings listed for each title begin with a bullet (•) and end with stamper numbers (the “S” numbers). These records are known to exist, and almost all are from RCA’s Indianapolis plant. Other pressings may exist: should you have any in your collection, please consider sharing the information with me, so that I may share it with others. Simply add the new information to the Comments sections below: stampers numbers in the order that I have the sides listed and whether there is an “H” or an “I” or an “R” in the trail-off area. You can also reach me via the Contact Me link at the footer of each page.



447-0637     She’s Not You / Just Tell Her Jim Said Hello
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (8S/8S).


447-0638     Return To Sender / Where Do You Come From
                       Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-B3/4S-A4).


447-0639     Kiss Me Quick / Suspicion
                       Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                      $       ___

                       NOTE: The existence of this record is unverified; there is no assigned value.


447-0640     One Broken Heart For Sale / They Remind Me Too Much Of You
                       Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30

                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-B2/4S-B2).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-B2/4S-C2).


447-0641     (You’re The) Devil In Disguise / Please Don’t Drag That Skin Around
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30

                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-A3/13S-A4).
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-A5/13S-A4).


447-0642     Bossa Nova Baby / Witchcraft
                       Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S-A2/3S-A2).


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447-0643     Crying In The Chapel / I Believe In The Man In The Sky
                       White label promo                                                                                            $   25–50
                       • Rockaway pressing with “Not For Sale” on one line (1S-A2/3S-A3).
                       Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   10–20
                       • Hollywood pressing with an “H” in the trail-off area. I Believe In / The Man In The Sky is on two lines. “I Believe In The Man In The Sky” is on one line with songwriter “(Richard Howard)” above the spindle hole (4S/4S).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area. I Believe In The Man In The Sky is on one line with songwriter “(Richard Howard)” below the spindle hole (3S/1S).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area. I Believe In The Man In The Sky is on one line with songwriter “(Richard Howard)” below the spindle hole (3S-A1/1S-K-B1).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area. I Believe In The Man In The Sky is on one line with songwriter “(Richard Howard)” below the spindle hole (3S-B2/1S-A2).

                       • Rockaway pressing with an “R” in the trail-off area. I Believe In The Man In The Sky is on one line with songwriter “(Richard Howard)” above the spindle hole (1S/3S).
                       Picture sleeve with gold tinted photo                                                           $   20–40
                       Picture sleeve with gray tinted photo                                                          $   15–30


447-0644     Kissin’ Cousins / It Hurts Me
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-B2/8S-A3).


447-0645     Such A Night / Never Ending
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-A3/3S-A4).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-A3/4S-A4).


447-0646     Viva Las Vegas / What’d I Say
                       Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                      $   30–60
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-A6/4S-A4).


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447-0647     Blue Christmas / Santa Claus Is Back In Town
                      White label promo                                                                                            $   30–60
                      • Hollywood pressing with “Not For Sale” on two lines (7S/3S)*.
                      • Rockaway pressing with “Not For Sale” on one line (1S/1S).
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                        $   15–30
                      • Hollywood pressing with an “H” in the trail-off area, and Santa Claus Is Back / In Town on two lines (?S/?S).

                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area, and Santa Claus Is Back In Town is on one line (3S-B1/2S-C2).
                      • Rockaway pressing with an “R” in the trail-off area, and Santa Claus Is Back In Town is on one line (1S-A1/1S-A3).

                      • Rockaway pressing with an “R” in the trail-off area, and Santa Claus Is Back In Town is on one line (1S-A2/1S-A1).
                      • Unidentified pressing with an “H” in the trail-off area, and Santa Claus / Is Back In Town on two lines (2S/1S).

                      Picture sleeve with “Gold Standard Series” in the upper left                 $   30–60

 

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This sleeve features a photo of Elvis from 1969 and was issued in 1987; it is included here to illustrate the differences between it and the original sleeve from 1965 above. For more information, refer to Elvis’ Gold Standard 45s Part 8.


447-0648     Do The Clam / You’ll Be Gone
                        Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                    $   30–60
                        • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (6S-A1/5S-A1).


447-0649     Ask Me / Ain’t That Loving You, Baby
                       Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                    $   30–60
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (1S-1A/3S-C3).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S-1A/3S-C3).


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447-0650     Puppet On A String / Wooden Heart
                       White label promo                                                                                            $   30–60
                       • Hollywood pressing with “Not For Sale” on two lines (4S/9S)*.
                       Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                       $   15–30
                       • Hollywood pressing with an “H” in the trail-off area. On the B-side, “Gladys Music / Inc. / ASCAP / L2PW-3681” is on four lines (4S/9S).
                       • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area. On the B-side, “Gladys Music / Inc., ASCAP / L2PW-3681” is on three lines, and “Recorded July 19, 1960” is at approximately 8 o’clock (3S-A3/5S-A3).
                       • Rockaway pressing with an “R” in the trail-off area. On the B-side, “Gladys Music / Inc., ASCAP / L2PW-3681” is on three lines, and “Recorded July 19, 1960” is at approximately 8:30 o’clock (1S/8S).
                       Picture sleeve                                                                                                   $   20–40


1966


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447-0651     Joshua Fit The Battle / Known Only To Him
                      White label promo                                                                                           $  50–100
                      • Rockaway pressing with “Not For Sale” on one line (2S/2S).
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                      $     15–30
                      • Hollywood pressing with an “H” in the trail-off area (6S/7S).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S/4S).
                       Picture sleeve                                                                                                 100–200


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The record at the top with NOT FOR SALE on the right side of the spindle hole and the recording date on the left side is from Rockaway. The middle record is more or less identical to the Rockaway pressing but does not have NOT FOR SALE on the side; it may be from Rockaway or Indianapolis. The record on the bottom with NOT FOR but without a recording date is from Hollywood.

447-0652     Milky White Way / Swing Down Sweet Chariot
                      
White label promo                                                                                         $   50–100
                       • Hollywood pressing with “Not For Sale” but without the recording date (6S/7S).
                       • Indianapolis (?) pressing without “Not For Sale” and with the recording date (?S/?S).
                       • Rockaway pressing with “Not For Sale” and with the recording date (1S/1S).
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                     $     15–30
                       • Hollywood pressing with an “H” in the trial-off area, but without the recording date. Swing Down Sweet / Chariot is on two lines (7S/7S).
                       • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trial-off area, and with the recording date. Swing Down Sweet Chariot is on one line (5S-A1/3S-A1)
                       • Rockaway pressing with an “R” in the trial-off area, and with the recording date. Swing Down Sweet Chariot is on one line (1S/1S).
                       Picture sleeve                                                                                                100–200

447-0653     (Such An) Easy Question / It Feels So Right
                      
Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                      $   20–40
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-A1/4S-A3).


447-0654     I’m Yours / (It’s A) Long Lonely Highway
                       Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                      $   25–50
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-A1/5S-A4).


1968


447-0655     Tell Me Why / Blue River
                      
Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                      $   25–50
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (9S/6S).


447-0656     Frankie And Johnny / Please Don’t Stop Loving Me
                      
Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                     $   40–80
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (?S/?S).


447-0657     Love Letters / Come What May
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                      $   20–40

                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-A5/4S-A1).


447-0658     Spinout / All That I Am
                      Black labels with “RCA Victor” on the right side                                      $   15–30

                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-B2/4S-B1).


Elvis_GS_0646_dos_A

While Viva Las Vegas is recognized as a minor gem among Presley’s soundtrack recordings of ’60s, such was not the case upon its release. Frankly, it was a terrible choice as a single in 1964, almost laughable during the height of the British Invasion. And so it was that many radio stations flipped the record over and played the other side, a reasonably exciting reading of Ray Charles’s What’d I Say. This split the air-time and affected various factors in how the magazine surveys at the time ranked records on their charts. (Check out the video of EP performing the song in the movie at the bottom of this page.)

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On Billboard, What’d I Say reached a very disappointing #21, while Viva Las Vegas only petered out at #29. On Cash Box there was a very different story: both sides were considerably bigger hits than either side were on Billboard! What’d I Say spent four weeks in the Top 20, peaking at #13, and Viva Las Vegas spent a week in the Top 20 at #16. So, had RCA promoted the B-side as the A-side from the beginning, it seems likely that What’d I Say would have been the second Top 10 hit of the year for Elvis on at least one national Top 100 survey! (Check out the video of EP performing the song in the movie at the bottom of this page.)


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HEADER IMAGE: The photo at the top of this page is from the 1968 movie Live A Little, Love A Little. The movie featured Michele Carey as Elvis’s love interest and she brought a more adult and obvious sexuality to the movie than many of the young women cast opposite him in recent years.

The movie actually has a dumb but likable pseudo-psychedelic dream, scene where Elvis sings Edge Of Reality while both the beauty and the beast in the picture above tease him. By this time in ’68, sales of Presley Product had reached its nadir; even the Gold Standard catalog was moribund in terms of generating income.


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ALTERNATIVE HEADER IMAGE: This was my original choice for the image for the top of this page, but I couldn’t find one large enough pixel-wise to use that gave me a sharp image. Still, I can use it here: it is a still from the movie Clambake.

In this scene, he is making a Fender Wildwood VI acoustic guitar sing like an electric lead guitar! Why? Good drugs? Great balls of fire, no! They did it because it’s a dumb Elvis movie and no one gave a rat’s arse about anything resembling consensual reality—just like other dumb movies made for the ‘teen market.’ 


Elvis_GoldSuit_1959

Postscritually, “The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 5 (1965-1968)” is the fifth of a planned eight articles addressing the complete run of Gold Standard singles as collectable records. When it is completed, I will include a list of the articles with hyperlinks here at the bottom of each article for easy access.

Now, here are all the articles on the Elvis Gold Standard 45s listed in the suggested reading order:

1The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 1 (Foreword)

2The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 2 (Company Sleeves)

3The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 3 (1958–1965) 

4The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 4 (1964)

5. The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 5 (1965-1968)

6. Those Bloody Rare Orange Label Gold Standard 45s

7. The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 6 (1969)

8. The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 7 (1969–1976)

9. The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 8 (1976–2000)


Viva Las Vegas was not that much better than the other Elvis vehicles of the time: a few of the songs were superior to the norm. A few of Presley’s performances both as an actor and as a singer were superior to the norm. But it’s no great shakes here—except for Ann-Margret. She definitely affected the man and and entertainer. So here are two scenes from the movie featuring both sides of the single from the movie.


Viva Las Vegas featured solo performances by Ann and duet between the two, both of which are among the better tracks put on tape. Had the bloody Colonel had any vision left at this time, he would not have blocked RCA from issuing a soundtrack LP album with her recordings on it. It would certainly have ranked among the best Elvis soundtrack albums of the decade and may have been one of the biggest sellers. Alas, we will never know . . .

 

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