the elvis presley gold standard 45s part 7 (1969–1976)

IN 1969, THE GOLD STANDARD SERIES was changed for a third time: the visually lifeless orange label was replaced by a more attractive bright red label. (The orange label remain as the primary label for RCA’s standard catalog singles and albums.) Otherwise, the layout and the typeface remained the same from the previous to the newest. 

This is the seventh of eight articles that provides collectors with the most complete and accurate discography and price guide to Elvis’ Gold Standard 45s and picture sleeves on the Internet!

In 1968, RCA had switched from its classic black label to a more ‘modern’ orange label for all its records. Whether this change was intended to affect the Gold Standard Series remains unclear: the amount of orange label GS records is so small that it as long been assumed that they were erroneously pressed and then forgotten by RCA.

Ignored by collectors for decades, these red label singles have been attracting more attention from Elvis completists lately, many of whom are finding that some numbers among the red labels are rather rare records indeed. As copies of original 45s from the ’50s (with a 47 prefix) and earlier Gold Standards become more difficult to find in higher grades, interest in these later pressings will grow. 1


[one_fourth]Elvis_GS_0601_dot_cs_150[/one_fourth][one_fourth]Elvis_GS_0652_dos_cs_150[/one_fourth][one_fourth]Elvis_GS_0605_orange_cs_150[/one_fourth][one_fourth_last]Elvis_GS_0617_red_cs_150[/one_fourth_last]

Indianapolis pressings may be the only pressings

Since the ’60s, RCA’s Indianapolis plant manufactured the vast majority of GS 45s. Indianapolis records are easily recognized: by the matrix numbers are machine-stamped into the trail-off area (the dead wax around the label).

There should also be a capital ‘I’ with serifs (referred to as a cross-beam ‘I’) stamped into the same area, but this marking can be difficult to see in some light.

For the sake of this discography, I have identified two primary label layouts, each based on the information printed on the right side of the label. I refer to them simply as Red label 1 and Red label 2 . . .


Elvis_GS_0647_orange_A_full

Elvis_GS_0602_red

As you can see, the design that RCA had used for the orange Gold Standards—which was the same as the company’s catalog records—was the same design used for the red label.

RCA’s basic label template

The basic label template that RCA shipped to the regional printers that worked with their pressing plants had only three bits of information:

•  “RCA” in white, open-block letters ran vertically up the left side.

•  “Victor” in a plain white, san serif type (Helvetica, of course) was set horizontally on the right side.

•  “TMK(s)” and other trademark information in tiny type on two lines laid across the bottom of the label.

Every label has that information in the same style and in the same places. These labels were shipped to the regional printers who worked with RCA’s plants. The rest of the label data was set by these local shops working with RCA instructions on the rest of the layout:

•  The artist’s name in plain black block type (all caps) was above the spindle hole.

•  The song title in the same type was below the spindle hole but above the TMK)s) data.

•  The songwriter credits appear below the title in lowercase type.

These three lines of type were flushed left with a hard vertical line. The variations on Red label 1 and Red label 2 all take place on the right side of the spindle hole below “Victor.”

NOTE: A noticeable and welcome change was the addition of GOLD STANDARD to the right side of the spindle hole. This was the first time that the series was acknowledged on a single with anything other than a catalog number!

Red label 1: without publishing data

This first label can also be called the simple version due to its having less information than Red label 2. There are four bits of information on five lines on the right side: “GOLD STANDARD” (two lines) and the 447 catalog number are above “Victor” while the matrix number is below. Like so:

   GOLD
   STANDARD
   [catalog number]
   Victor
   [matrix number]

Elvis_GS_0600_red_x

These five lines are usually flushed left and usually with a hard vertical line. Usually but not always: the example above has the “V” in “Victor” veering a few points port-side. This is a minor type-setting error.

Red label 2: with publishing data

A more detailed variation (the complex version) has six bits of information on at least eight lines of type on the right side. Like the simple version, “GOLD STANDARD” and the catalog number are above “Victor.” But below “Victor” it is a very different critter: first comes a credit for the song’s publisher with either ASCAP or BMI taking up two or three lines. Then comes the matrix number (one line) followed by the side’s running time (one line). Like so:

   GOLD
   STANDARD
   [catalog number]
   Victor
   [publishing data]
   [matrix number]
   [time]

Elvis_GS_0640_red_A

These lines are flushed left with a hard vertical line. Like the example above with the mis-aligned “V,” don’t be surprised to find similar type-setting errors.

A few more discrepancies

There are several other discrepancies for which I have not found a pattern. Each of the four label variations below may be found on either or both Red label 1 and Red label 2, but in no discernible or predictable pattern:

•  Copies may be found without GOLD STANDARD on the right side.

•  Copies may be found with MONO above GOLD STANDARD on the right side.

•  Copies may be found with or without a recording date above the spindle hole.

•  Copies may be found with the month, day, and year in the recording date or simply the year.

•  Copies may have either “TMK(s) • REGISTERED” in all upper case or “TMK(s) • Registered” in upper/lower case at bottom of the label.

Designated promos

Copies of either label variation may be found with small white sticker that reads NOT FOR SALE. These stickers are usually affixed to just one side, but may be found oon both sides of the record. These stickers designate stock copies of the record for promotional use. 2


Elvis_GS_0601_red+NFS

This is an example of a computer-created designated promo. The NOT FOR SALE stickers were apparently placed by hand, as there is neither rhyme nor reason to their placement: right side or left, top or bottom. They could be on one side of record or on both—some are even upside down!

This usually means that they were shipped to radio stations in hopes of obtaining exposure via airplay. These are often referred to as designated promos and usually command a small premium from a savvy seller. 3

Gold Standard company sleeves

Each GS 45 was shipped in a protective paper sleeve. These sleeves may have been plain white or brown paper with no print whatsoever; this was the most inexpensive way to go and every record company used such sleeves.

There are enough typographic variations on the two primary label layouts to keep a collector searching and happily buying red label Gold Standard 45s for years to come.

The record companies also had specially manufactured sleeves that featured the record company’s name, often with a logo or an eye-catching design. These generic sleeves did not identify individual records by having titles or catalog numbers printed on them!

That is, these sleeves merely identified the record within as company product without specifying what the individual product was. Record collectors refer to these by several terms:

•  manufacturers sleeves
•  factory sleeves
•  company sleeves

These are effectively synonymous terms but it is company sleeves that I favor and use exclusively in my articles on record collecting.

For the Perfect Elvis Collection, each GS 45 should be housed in a GS sleeve manufactured at the time for use with that record. Of course, overlapping of older sleeves with newer records was common with the Gold Standards, but that should not stop a collector from seeking out the correct sleeve for each record in his collection.

For this article, I am listing those sleeves that were manufactured contemporaneously with the red label records listed below. For more information on all Gold Standard company sleeves, refer to “elvis gold standard 45s part 2.”


Elvis_GS_cs3a

Elvis_GS_cs_1965c

Elvis_GS_cs3b

Gold Standard company sleeve design 2

This sleeve was introduced in the mid-’60s and lasted into 1973, when most of the red label GS 45s were released. Therefore, every red label record in your collection from 1970-1973—and that is every record with a 447 prefix—should be accompanied by one of these sleeves!

There are two variations on this sleeve:

•  The paper on the inside of the sleeve is the same yellow color as the paper on the outside (bottom image above).

•  The paper on the inside of the sleeve is white instead of yellow (middle image above).

I don’t know if this is an indicator of two different printers making the sleeves or one printer whose stock changed over time. I also don’t know if it matters.


Elvis_GS_cs4

Gold Standard company sleeve design 3

This sleeve was introduced in 1974 and was shipped with the later red label numbers with the GB prefix. For some reason, this design had a very short shelf life: it was used for little more than a year before RCA being replaced with another new design in 1976.


Elvis_GS_cs_1976

Gold Standard company sleeve design 4

This sleeve was introduced in 1976 and may have been in use when the final red labels were issued (10486–10489), so it’s okay to associate them with those later numbers. It was certainly used for the ‘new black’ label numbers (“RCA” on top) which also appeared in ’76. This sleeve lasted into 1989!

A tip for collectors

All Gold Standard company sleeves were made equal: these sleeves were used with GS 45s by other RCA artists, most of whom are not very collectable. Should you be flipping through stacks of 45s and come across a Gold Standard record by other artists in NM sleeves and the seller wants a couple of quarters for the record, buy it! The sleeve can be removed and used to replace an anomalous sleeve on one of the Presley platters in your collection.

Assigning the values

Each record below is assigned a value for the record in near mint condition. Here, NM means that the labels and the vinyl on both sides of the record are almost ‘like new.’ The assigned value for most records is a 2:1 spread: the high value is twice that of the low value. A few that are still in limbo regarding their rarity and value have a 3:1 ratio. 4

The high number in the assigned values more accurately reflects rarity, while the low number reflects what these records might be purchased for on the Internet.

If I am correct, the high number in the assigned values more accurately reflects rarity and real value—and what these records might fetch when sold by a knowledgeable dealer to a knowledgeable collector.

The low number reflects what these records might be purchased for when sold by someone not aware of the record’s actual worth. (That is, a non-knowledgeable dealer, which is most of the sellers on the Internet.)

The numbers were arrived at by hours of research on the Internet, primarily the Popsike, Collectors Frenzy and Gripsweat websites. My own ‘common sense’ based on forty years of activity in buying and selling records and writing about buying and selling records also came into play.

Please note that copies of these records in less than NM condition usually sell for significantly lower prices. For records in VG+ condition, start at half the value of a NM copy and work down from there.

Copies of most numbers in VG condition have little value.

The images of the records

I don’t own the records that are illustrated below. I pulled these images off the Internet, hence the variable quality of those images.

They are placed in the discography below to break up the monotony of the list, although each image is can be found near its listing.

And now for the discography

The discography and price guide section that follows should be self-explanatory. I assume that most readers have seen and used some form of price guide for some sort of collectable. Since I know that I should never assume anything, let’s take a quick walk through it anyway.

The records are listed in chronological order based on the catalog numbers. Each listing has three lines of information:

•  Line 1 has the catalog number followed by the titles of the two songs on the record.

•  Line 2 notes that it is in fact a red label record, which is followed by the assigned value.

•  Line 3 notes that the record was pressed at Indianapolis and is identified as such by machine-stamped numbers in the trail-off vinyl. The  indicates that that pressing is known to exist.

I again have to assume that all the numbers below were made in Indianapolis—records pressed elsewhere would be rare indeed. Any record with engraved or etched numbers in the trail-off area probably indicate another pressing plant’s product. These would probably be rather rare records and I would certainly appreciate your notifying me of their existence . . .




Elvis_GS_0601_red

A red label copy of 447-0601 with Elvis’s surname misspelled as PRESELY on the B-side was auctioned on eBay and sold for $6,000 in 2011! Me thinks this is one of those bogus stunts that people pull off for attention. Why? Because subsequent sales of this record have been for $114 and $32 in 2012, $79 in 2013, and $100 in 2014.


1969

447-0600     I Forgot To Remember To Forget / Mystery Train
                      
Red labels with “RCA” on the left side left side                                        $   10–20
                       • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S/3S).
                       • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5SA1/5SA1).


447-0601    That’s All Right / Blue Moon Of Kentucky
                     
Red labels with “RCA” on the left side (“Presley”)                                    $    10–20
                       • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (6S/6S).
• Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (6SA1/7S).
                       Red labels with “RCA” on the left side (“Presely”)                                    $ 50–100
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (7SA1/7SA1).
                       NOTE: See the caption to the image below . . .


447-0602     Good Rocking Tonight / I Don’t Care If The Sun Don’t Shine
                     
 Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (8S/5S).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (9SA1/8SA2).


447-0603     Milkcow Blues Boogie / You’re A Heartbreaker
                     
Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (2SA1/5S).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3SA2/5SA1).


447-0604     Baby, Let’s Play House / I’m Left, You’re Right, She’s Gone
                     
Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (?S/?S).


447-0605     Heartbreak Hotel / I Was The One
                     
Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                        $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (6S/2S).



VALUES FOR LOWER GRADES: The values listed here are for records with labels and vinyl in near mint condition (NM). Records in a lower grade condition are worth considerably less: a record graded VG+ might be worth approximately one-half (40-50%) of the listed value. A record in VG condition might be worth no more than one-fifth (10-20%) of the listed value. 



447-0607     I Want You, I Need You, I Love You / My Baby Left Me
                     
 Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                        $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5SA1/3S).


447-0608     Hound Dog / Don’t Be Cruel
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                        $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (7SA1/8SC3).


447-0609     Blue Suede Shoes / Tutti Frutti
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                        $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S/3S-A1).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-A1/3S-A2).


447-0610     I Got A Woman / I’m Counting On You
                     Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                          $    _____

                      NOTE: The existence of this record is unverified; there is no assigned value.


447-0611     I’ll Never Let You Go (Little Darlin’) / I’m Gonna Sit Right Down And Cry (Over You)
                     Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                          $    _____

                      NOTE: The existence of this record is unverified; there is no assigned value.


447-0612     Tryin’ To Get To You / I Love You Because
                     Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                          $    _____

                      NOTE: The existence of this record is unverified; there is no assigned value.


Elvis_GS_0613_red

Elvis recorded Blue Moon in 1954 in an arrangement that sounds like Sam Philips had a western movie on his mind. Presley’s vocal is noticeably smoother—and more ‘professional’—than what we associate with his first months with Sun Records. While most rock & roll fans think of the Marcels’ (wacky doo-wop) hit version first and foremost when they think of this song, Presley’s version is the one I expect to find The Most Wholly Grommett listening to in Heaven.


447-0613     Blue Moon / Just Because
                     Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (2S-B1/5S).


447-0614     Money Honey / One Sided Love Affair
                     Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    15–30

                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (1S-A1/5S).


447-0615     Shake, Rattle And Roll / Lawdy, Miss Clawdy
                     Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S/5S).
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (6S-A1/6S-A1).


447-0616     Love Me Tender / Any Way You Want Me (That’s How I Will Be)
                     Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-A1/4S-A1).
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-A1/4S-A2).


Elvis_GS_0617_red_cs

This company sleeve first saw the light of day in 1976, at the end of the run for the red label design for Gold Standard singles. Red label records can be found in the three previous company sleeves, none of which have any affect on the value of the record.


447-0617     Too Much / Playing For Keeps
                     Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                        $    10–20
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S/3S).
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-A1/4S-A1).


447-0618     All Shook Up / That’s When Your Heartaches Begin
                     Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (2S-A2/2S-B1).


447-0619     Jailhouse Rock / Treat Me Nice
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (18S-A1/13S-A1).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (18S-D1/14S-A1).


447-0620     (Let Me Be Your) Teddy Bear / Loving You
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (11S-A1/14S-A1).


447-0621     Don’t / I Beg Of You
                     Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S/17S).


447-0622     Wear My Ring Around Your Neck / Doncha’ Thinks It’s Time
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (14S-A1/14S).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (14S-A1/15S-A1).


447-0623     Hard Headed Woman/ Don’t Ask Me Why
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (11S/11S).


447-0624     I Got Stung / One Night
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (12S/11S-A-A1).


447-0625     (Now And Then There’s) A Fool Such As I / I Need Your Love Tonight
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (9S/9S).


447-0626     A Big Hunk O’ Love / My Wish Came True
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (11S/11S).


Elvis_GS_0620_red_cs

This company sleeve first was used very briefly in 1974-75 before being (wisely) replaced by the sleeve shown with 447-0617 above. Red label records can be found in the three previous company sleeves, none of which have any affect on the value of the record. This sleeve’s short lifespan may indicate a modest amount manufactured in those two years, and that they may become collectable in the future—like many a couple hundred years from now . . .


447-0627     Stuck On You / Fame And Fortune
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (23S/24S).


447-0628     It’s Now Or Never / A Mess Of Blues
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (19S-A2/11S-A1).


447-0629     Are You Lonesome Tonight / I Gotta Know
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (11S/1S-A4).


447-0630     Surrender / Lonely Man
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (12S/2S-A2).


447-0631     I Feel So Bad / Wild In The Country
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    _____

                       NOTE: The existence of this record is unverified; there is no assigned value.


Elvis_GS_0634_red_B

Because His Latest Flame peaked one position higher than Little Sister on Billboard’s Hot 100 (#4 and #5, respectively), there is a tendency to think that it was the A-side instead of the B-side that RCA and Elvis intended. There is also a tendency to see it as the bigger hit in the US.

Not necessarily so: His Latest Flame spent eleven weeks on that survey, two of them in the Top 10. Little Sister spent thirteen weeks there with four in the Top 10, so the nod would seem to go to the latter as the bigger hit.


Elvis_GS_0634_red_A

On Cash Box’s Top 100 it wasn’t even close: Little Sister spent three weeks at #5 while His Latest Flame stalled at #21! Had Presley and RCA had the sense to issue these as two separate A-sides, they might have had another pair of #1 hits in 1961. Please note that in the UK, His Latest Flame was the side that received the bulk of the attention and should be considered the A-side there.


447-0634     Little Sister / (Marie’s The Name) His Latest Flame
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-B1/7S-B1).


447-0635     Can’t Help Falling In Love / Rock-A-Hula Baby
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (7S-C1/7S-A2).


447-0636     Good Luck Charm / Anything That’s Part Of You
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-B3/4S-A4).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-B4/4S-A4).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-B5/4S-A4).


Elvis_GS_0637_red_B

Supposedly, Elvis fancied Just Tell Her Jim Said Hello as the A-side to his next single: One can see why: it is a nice song, the arrangement and production lean and clean with a sound that sparkles fifty years later. And Elvis sings like an angel. But it doesn’t work: the immediate and obvious problem is Elvis naming himself “Jim”—a HUGE mistake. Wouldn’t it have been smarter if he had sung, “Just tell her I said hello”?

But even had that been so, this just doesn’t have the zest appeal needed to make the toppermost of the poppermost. Whether it was Elvis or RCA who nixed it as an A-side, it was the right move. Nonetheless, a minor gem of a record and a fave with many Presley connoisseurs.


447-0637     She’s Not You / Just Tell Her Jim Said Hello
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (8S/8S).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (9S/8S).


447-0638     Return To Sender / Where Do You Come From
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-B3/4S-B2).


447-0639     Kiss Me Quick / Suspicion
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S-B1/7S-A1).


Elvis_GS_0640_red_A

The existence of this record surprised me: Popsike does not have a single copy have sold at auction for more than $25 in the past ten years. Neither Collectors Frenzy nor Gripsweat list one as having sold elsewhere. This could mean it’s a nothing record with nominal value (less than $15), but that is unlikely; or it could men it’s so rare that it rarely pops up for sale! Consequently, I have assigned it a very broad range of value.


447-0640     One Broken Heart For Sale / They Remind Me Too Much Of You
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                          $   15–150
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S/4S)*.


447-0641     (You’re The) Devil In Disguise / Please Don’t Drag That Skin Around
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-A3/13S).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-C1/17S-A4).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-C2/17S-A2).


447-0642     Bossa Nova Baby / Witchcraft
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S-C1/4S-B1).


447-0643     Crying In The Chapel / I Believe In The Man In The Sky
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (9S/9S).


447-0644     Kissin’ Cousins / It Hurts Me
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-B1/9S-A2).



SOLICITATION: The pressings listed for each title begin with a bullet (•) and end with stamper numbers (the “S” numbers). These records are known to exist, and almost all are from RCA’s Indianapolis plant. Other pressings may exist: should you have any in your collection, please consider sharing the information with me, so that I may share it with others. Simply add the new information to the Comments sections below: stamper-numbers in the order that I have the sides listed and whether there is an “H” or an “I” or an “R” in the trail-off area. You can also reach me via the Contact Me link at the footer of each page.



447-0645     Such A Night / Never Ending
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-A3/3S-A4).


447-0646     Viva Las Vegas / What’d I Say
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-A6/5S-A1).


447-0647     Blue Christmas / Santa Claus Is Back In Town
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                        $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S-B6/2S-A3).


447-0648    Do The Clam / You’ll Be Gone
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    20–40
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (6S-A1/9S).


447-0649     Ask Me / Ain’t That Loving You, Baby
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                        $    _____

                       NOTE: The existence of this record is unverified; there is no assigned value.




447-0650     Puppet On A String / Wooden Heart
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (7S-A1/5S-A6).


Elvis_GS_0643_red

On October 31, Elvis recorded fourteen new tracks: twelve were released in early ’61 as the album HIS HAND IN MINE, which continues to sell fifty years later! The single Surrender was issued at the same time and was a worldwide #1 that sold millions. Why Crying In The Chapel—arguably the highlight of this fantastic session—sat on the shelves for four years has been mooted about for years.

Suffice to say that it was a big hit in 1965, reminding people that Presley was still in the game at a time when the British Invasion had made him look dinosaurian. Apparently it also inspired RCA to pull four more tracks from the LP and issue them as GS 45s in 1966, but without any airplay or success at all.


447-0651     Joshua Fit The Battle / Known Only To Him
                     Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    _____

                      NOTE: The existence of this record is unverified; there is no assigned value.


447-0652     Milky White Way / Swing Down, Sweet Chariot
                     Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    _____

                      NOTE: The existence of this record is unverified; there is no assigned value.


447-0653     (Such An) Easy Question / It Feels So Right
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    _____

                       NOTE: The existence of this record is unverified; there is no assigned value.


447-0654     I’m Yours / (It’s A) Long Lonely Highway
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    20–40

                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (?S/?S).


447-0655     Tell Me Why / Blue River
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    _____

                       NOTE: The existence of this record is unverified; there is no assigned value.


447-0656     Frankie And Johnny / Please Don’t Stop Loving Me
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    40–80
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (8S-A1/9S-A1).


447-0657     Love Letters / Come What May
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (10S/11S).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (11S-A1/11S).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (11S-A1/12S-A1).


Elvis_GS_0665_red

Released as We Call On Him / You’ll Never Walk Alone in 1968, these sides have never sold well as a 45. Consequently, collectors have long recognized any permutation that has seen the light of day is a rather rare record and therefore sought after. This number is one of the more valuable red label pressings, although the value assigned below may be conservative should you want a near mint copy today.


447-0658     Spinout / All That I Am
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (10S/10S).


447-0659     Indescribably Blue / Fools Fall In Love
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-A3/5S-A3).


447-0660     Long Legged Girl (With The Short Dress On) / That’s Someone You Never Forget
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    40–80

                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (?S/?S).


447-0661     There’s Always Me / Judy
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    40–80
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (?S/?S).


447-0662     Big Boss Man / You Don’t Know Me
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (7S-A1/7S).


447-0663     Guitar Man / Hi-Heel Sneekers
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-A1/5S-A1).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-A3/5S-A3).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (6S-A1/4S-A3).


Elvis_GS_0666_red

The year 1968 was a make-or-break point in Presley’s career and his efforts had mixed results: Let Yourself Go / Your Time Hasn’t Come Yet Baby was arguably the best double-sided soundtrack single in four years, but no one much cared. Exactly which side should be considered the hit side is debatable if you rely on Billboard: Let Yourself Go reached #71 while Your Time Hasn’t Come Yet Baby was #72 but stayed two weeks longer on that survey’s Hot 100. It’s a clearer picture using Cash Box: Let Yourself Go reached #55 while Your Time Hasn’t Come Yet Baby stalled out at #63.

As there were more than enough of the original pressing of the record sitting around for years, the press run for the red label Gold Standard reissue was minuscule, allowing for this number to be very hard to find forty-five years later. (PS: This was a very good single that deserved more airplay than it received in ’68.)


447-0664     U.S. Male / Stay Away
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-A2/4S-A2).


1970


447-0665     You’ll Never Walk Alone / We Call On Him
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                        $    25–50
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-A2/4S-A1).


447-0666     Let Yourself Go / Your Time Hasn’t Come Yet Baby
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                          $   50–100
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-A2/5S-A2).


447-0667     A Little Less Conversation / Almost In Love
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                        $    40–80
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-A4/5S-A1).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (10S-A1/5S-A1).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (10S-A1/6S-A1).


Elvis_GS_0668_red_A_cs

The first single from the ‘Singer Presents Elvis’ NBC-TV Special was If I Can Dream. To me, it was then and is now one of the defining moments in Elvis Presley’s life. At the time of its release in late 1968, it was pretty much make-or-break time for Elvis: a lame single and a pedestrian television special could have killed his career.

At the time, I was 17-years old and waited with a trepidation surpassed only by my need (and fear of) losing my virginity. Presley came through with If I Can Dream—arguably his most soul-filled performance ever—which was matched by the TV show. The red label pressing is not that easy to find in near mint condition . . .


Elvis_GS_0669_red_A

The first single from the ‘Singer Presents Elvis’ NBC-TV Special was Memories. Legend has it that producer Steve Binder tested Elvis by asking if he would have considered recording MacArthur Park had it been offered him first. Elvis said he would have. Binder was pleased. What does that have to do with anything about Memories? Nothing.

But this could have been a fine project for Frank Sinatra: “Of holding hands and red bouquets, and twilight trimmed in purple haze, and laughing eyes and simple ways, and quiet nights and gentle days with you.” This is also more difficult to find then the values suggest.


447-0668     If I Can Dream / Edge Of Reality
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                        $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (10-A1/14-A2).


447-0669     Memories / Charro
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-A3/5S-A1).


447-0670     How Great Thou Art / His Hand In Mine
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    50–100
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S-A2/3S-B2).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S-B2/3S-A1).


Elvis_GS_0670_red_cs

The reasoning behind pairing the two titles songs from Presley’s two sacred LP albums (HIS HAND IN MINE from 1961 and HOW GREAT THOU ART from 1967) and releasing them as a regular catalog 45 may remain an undecipherable secret forever. It is a rather rare record in whatever form it is found as a single and the value here may be optimistic from a buyer’s perspective.


447-0671     In The Ghetto / Any Day Now
                     Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                     • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S-C1/7S-C1).


447-0672     Clean Up Your Own Back Yard / The Fair Is Moving On
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-A3/3S-A3).


447-0673     Suspicious Minds / You’ll Think Of Me
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S-A2/3S-B3).


447-0674     Don’t Cry, Daddy / Rubberneckin’
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-B1/7S-B4).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-C2/31S-A1).


1971

447-0675     Kentucky Rain / My Little Friend
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S-A3/4S-A3).


447-0676     The Wonder Of You / Mama Liked The Roses
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-A3/30S-A4).


447-0677     I’ve Lost You / The Next Step Is Love
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-A1/5S-B1).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (5S-A3/4S-A4).


447-0678     You Don’t Have To Say You Love Me / Patch It
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (4S-A4/6S-A4).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (6S-B1/6S-A5).


447-0679     I Really Don’t Want To Know / There Goes My Everything
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (30S-A1/30S-A1).


Elvis_GS_0680_red_cs_auto

Someone took their record to Vegas and got an autograph with a message, but I’ll be dingdanged if I can make out all of Presley’s scrawl: “Best Wishes Mugg. Elvis Presley ’77. [?????] notice this recording date – ten years after the Army and Germany. I recorded it 1967 – April 3, N. York and re-recorded it in L.A. in 1970.” Maybe. This is a very hard to find record but little demand except from completists.


447-0680     Where Did They Go, Lord / Rags To Riches
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                          $    40–80
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S-A4/3S-B3).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S-B2/3S-B4).


447-0681     If Every Day Was Like Christmas / How Would You Like To Be
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (3S-A1/10S-A1).
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (10S-A1/10S-A1).


1972

447-0682     Life / Only Believe
                     
Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                        $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (2S-B1-A/1S-C1-B).


447-0683     I’m Leavin’ / Heart Of Rome
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    40–80
                     • Rockaway pressing with an “R” in the trail-off area (6S-B1-A/5S-A7-A).
                     • Rockaway pressing with an “R” in the trail-off area (6S-B1-C/5S-B1-B).
                     • Rockaway pressing with an “R” in the trail-off area (6S-B1-C/5S-B2-B).
NOTE: Curious, but there does not appear to have been an Indianapolis pressing for this record.


447-0684     It’s Only Love / The Sound Of Your Cry
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    15–30
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (1S-A1/1S-B1).
                      • Rockaway pressing with an “R” in the trail-off area (3S-B2-A/4S-A2-A).
                      • Rockaway pressing with an “R” in the trail-off area (3S-B2-B/4S-A2-A).


1973

447-0685     An American Trilogy / Until It’s Time For You To Go
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    10–20
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (6S-A1/5S-B2).

 

Elvis_GS_10157_red_cs

Each of the seven Gold Standard numbers issued with red labels in 1975 and ’76 listed below are very valuable records indeed. Good luck finding any of them anywhere at any price any time soon . . .


1975

GB-10156     Burning Love / Steamroller Blues
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    25–75
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (7S-A1/7S-A1).


GB-10157     Raised On Rock / If You Talk In Your Sleep
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $   25–75
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (1S-A1/1-A1).

 

GB-10485     I’ve Got A Thing About You, Baby / Take Good Care Of Her
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $   25–75
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (APBO-0196-B2/APBO-0196-A1)*.

 


GB-10486     Separate Ways / Always On—My Mind
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $   25–75
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (BPKM-1149-2S/BPKM-1259-2S)*.

 

GB-10487     T-R-O-U-B-L-E / Mr. Songman
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                         $    25–75
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (20S-A5/1-A1).

 

GB-10488     Promised Land / It’s Midnight
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                          $    25–75
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (1/3-A7).

 

GB-10489     My Boy / Thinking About You
                      Red labels with “RCA” on the left side                                                          $    25–75
                      • Indianapolis pressing with an “I” in the trail-off area (A-A1/A2).

 

There are enough truly hard-to-find-in-near-mint-condition numbers and enough typographic variations on the two primary label layouts to keep a collector searching and buying red label Elvis Gold Standard 45s for many, many years to come . . .



Elvis_GS_7_Header_Rolex1

HEADER IMAGE: In 1970, Elvis Presley was given a Rolex watch as a thank you for playing six sold-out shows at the Houston Astrodome Livestock Show & Rodeo. It was a limited edition King Midas with only 1,000 pieces made; Elvis wore #343, which happened to be a left-handed special. It was engraved “To Elvis Presley From The Houston Livestock Show Officers 1970.” 

The King Midas was a solid gold watch made in the early ’60s; it was the heaviest watch in the industry at that time. The distinguishing features of this watch were that it was a manual wind, the crown was in the shape of the sun, it had a unique shape and style. (AmitDevHanda)


Elvis_GoldSuit_1959

Postscriptually, this article (“elvis gold standard 45s part 7 (1970 – 1976)”) is one of eight that attempts to provide collectors with the most complete discography and price guide for Elvis Gold Standard 45s available. Needless to say, it is neither compete nor perfect: corrections, additions, suggestions, and even argumentations are welcome . . .

Now, here are all the articles on the Elvis Gold Standard 45s listed in the suggested reading order:

1The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 1 (Foreword)

2The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 2 (Company Sleeves)

3The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 3 (1958–1965) 

4The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 4 (1964)

5. The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 5 (1965-1968)

6. Those Bloody Rare Orange Label Gold Standard 45s

7. The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 6 (1969)

8. The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 7 (1969–1976)

9. The Elvis Presley Gold Standard 45s Part 8 (1976–2000)



FOOTNOTES:

1   I found seven instances of a red label GS 45 selling for more than $100 at auction on eBay. In July of this year, one seller offered three unplayed records (447-0656, -0680, and -0683) with a minimum bid of $102 each and sold the three to one (discerning?) (deluded?) collector at that price.

2   When Jerry Osborne introduced the concept of the designated promo in one of the early editions of an O’Sullivan Woodside price guide, I confess that I laughed at it as absurd. Useless. I was wrong, he was not.

3   In the months following Presley’s death in August 1977, radio stations that had rarely if ever played his music were inundating the airwaves with All Elvis – All the Time! programming. To encourage more play, RCA affixed these NOT FOR SALE stickers to thousands of red and new black label records and shipped them!

Copies of these records were plentiful on the collectors market for years afterwards, usually selling for a dollar or two more than than a regular copy, which sold for all of a buck apiece in the early ’80s.

4   For more detailed information on grading records, refer to my “On Grading Records” on this site.


Elvis_GS_0641_red_A_cs

Presley’s last gasp at real rock & roll before perpetrating one of the great crimes in pop music history: giving up rock & roll for Hollywood in 1963! Although never reaching #1 on a national survey (it peaked at #3 on both the Billboard and Cash Box surveys), it has been a staple of oldies radio for decades. (If you can find an oldies station anywhere.) Great record and to those arse-clenched critics who think it contrived, I suggest that they pause and reflect on this line: “Hold it, fellas. That don’t move me. Lets get real gone for a change.”



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