elvis’ golden caricatures volume 5 (stuck on the ’60s)


ELVIS PRESLEY IN THE ’60s has not captured the attention of caricaturists as the Elvis of the ’50s and the ’70s. In the former he was vibrant, sexy, charismatic, and at times a man-of-many-faces. In the latter, he was resplendent, then predictable, and finally, tragic if not pathetic.

In between—mainly 1960 through 1967—his image was often so damn wholesome, so non-sexy, he might as well have been spayed! Few artists are interested enough in these years to produce many works but still I found these for “Elvis’ Golden Caricatures Volume 5.”

In 1968, things changed. Elvis’ look(s) changed. He lost weight and got rid of the somewhat doughy look that popped up in several movies. He rid himself of he pouffy ‘do’s and combed his hair straight back while growing the biggest, flashiest sideburns of his life. He grew a beard for one movie and donned a three-piece ice cream suit for another.

He looked goooood.

He also brought a more invested, more aggressive approach to his recording—even though he was still almost exclusively cutting soundtrack songs for those movies. But A Little Less Conversation and Let Yourself Go were a step in the right direction.

And then there was December 8, 1968, and the world saw him very differently: Singer Presents Elvis gave us not Elvis the Pelvis but Elvis the Panther. Sleek, decked out in black leather, alert to every bit of stimuli, he was in complete command of the television screen.


Elvis' Golden Caricatures Volume 5: photo of Elvis in the 1968 NBC TV Special (standing up).

While watching Singer Presents Elvis on December 3, 1968, it was almost impossible to image that this was the same man who had just spent the past few years making movies like Harum Scarum, Frankie And Johnny, Double Trouble, and Clambake!

Elvis Presley was becoming interesting again, and the artists have taken notice: in both this and the second volume of ’60s caricatures, it is this Elvis appears the most often.

Oddly, the equally sleek, sexy, and perhaps in even more animated Elvis that returned to live performance in Las Vegas in July 1969 in an all black proto-jumpsuit has caught few caricaturist’s attention.

Finally, it was difficult to pinpoint exactly what year several of these images are meant to reflect . . .


Elvis' Golden Caricatures Volume 5: caricature of Elvis and Sinatra by Hirschfeld.

Artist: Hirschfeld

This is the advertisement for the Frank Sinatra Timex Show television special to “Welcome Home Elvis” from two years in the US Army. The art is by the inimitable Hirschfeld—who, like Elvis, is universally known by one name.



Elvis' Golden Caricatures Volume 5: caricature of Elvis by Bogdan Covaciu.

Artist: Bogdan Covaciu

I’m going with the striped shirt and the complete lack of sideburns to mean this is supposed to be Presley backstage during the making of the Frank Sinatra Timex television show.

 
 

Elvis' Golden Caricatures Volume 5: caricature of Elvis by David Pugliese.

Artist: David Pugliese

In 1960, after two years in the US Army, Elvis made two movies: a western in which he played a half-breed cowboy who didn’t sing, and another where he played soldier who sang more often than he talked!

One made a modest profit and little else, the other made a lot of money and generated an album that sold millions of copies. Guess which one served as the template for the bulk of Presley’s movie career?



Elvis' Golden Caricatures Volume 5: caricature of Elvis by Matt Burns.

Artist: Matt Burns

This one is difficult to pinpoint, but the haircut and the lack of sideburns could mean it’s the early ’60s.



Elvis' Golden Caricatures Volume 5: caricature of Elvis by Mark Draws.

Artist: Mark Draws

Looks like the Presley of the Follow That Dream and Kid Galahad era . . .



Artist: Alberto “Sting”  Russo

Elvis as the Walking Dead had Roustabout been about Zombies or vampires.



Elvis' Golden Caricatures Volume 5: caricature of Elvis and Priscilla's wedding by unknown artist.

Artist: Unknown

May 1, 1967. Most of the public had never seen Priscilla Beaulieu and when we did, we saw a woman who bordered on being a living caricature of a country & western singer, with the dyed black hair piled up high atop her head and the heavy make-up, especially the eyes. A fe years later, free of being Mrs. Presley (and the make-up that required), one of the most beautiful women in the world emerged.



Elvis' Golden Caricatures Volume 5: caricature of Elvis by Gabriel Balazs.

Artist: Gabriel Balazs

While two of these sketches appear to be from the early ’70s, the drawing is here as one of the few caricatures of Elvis from the movie Charro. That movie and Elvis’ attempts to capture the look and feel of Clint Eastwood’s Man-With-No-Name would seem a fairly ripe ground for artists.



Elvis' Golden Caricatures Volume 5: caricature of Elvis by Joan Vizcarra.

Artist: Joan Vizcarra

June 29, 1968, on the itty-bitty stage in NBC’s studio in Burbank, California.



Elvis' Golden Caricatures Volume 5: caricature of Elvis by Senad Nadarevic.

Artist: Senad Nadarevic

Elvis the Pelvis in the ’50s or Elvis the Panther in black leather in 1968?



Elvis' Golden Caricatures Volume 5: caricature of Elvis and Lionel Rose by Chris Grosz.

Artist: Chris Grosz

In December 1968, Elvis invited Lionel Rose to his house in Los Angeles for a visit. The 20-year-old Aboriginal boxer had come to California to defend his world bantamweight title against Mexican challenger Chucho Castillo.

Apparently the two men spent a couple of friendly hours together chatting and put up their dukes for the cameras. I don’t know why Chris Grosz makes Presley look bad here, but the (stupid) article that this drawing accompanied was even more insulting to Elvis.



Elvis' Golden Caricatures Volume 5: caricature of Elvis by Hanif Bahari.

Artist: Hanif Bahari

This Elvis has either sent too much time with Lou Reed or with Bram Stoker . . .


Elvis' Golden Caricatures Volume 5: caricature of Elvis by Felipe Camelo.

FEATURED IMAGE: Artist Felipe Camelo‘s image here seems to have used a very young Bob “Mr Incredible” Parr as his model.


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Postscriptually, I have to note that I have planned four volumes of caricatures of Elvis in the ’50s, two for the ’60s, and at least one for the ’70s. Although I am focusing on caricature, later posts might include other related art, especially fan art. Here are links to the other volumes:

Elvis’ Golden Caricatures Volume 1 (Rockin’ the ‘50s)
Elvis’ Golden Caricatures Volume 2 (Rollin’ the ‘50s)
Elvis’ Golden Caricatures Volume 3 (Rattlin’ the ‘50s)
Elvis’ Golden Caricatures Volume 4 (Shaggin’ the ‘50s)
Elvis’ Golden Caricatures Volume 5 (Stuck On The ‘60s)
Elvis’ Golden Caricatures Volume 6 (Wild In The ’60s)

 

Elvis' Golden Caricatures Volume 5: photo of Priscilla Presley.

Priscilla Beaulieu Presley . . . as God (not Elvis) intended.


 
 

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