the original RIAA gold standard was based on units of one million

THE ORIGINAL RIAA GOLD RECORDS were introduced in 1958, and there were only two awards: a Gold Record for singles, and a Gold Record for LPs. To qualify, a single must have sold a minimum of one million (1,000,000) copies, while an LP album must have sold one million dollars ($1,000,000) at the manufacturer’s wholesale price. There were no “unit” sales required for LP certification, and there were no Platinum Record Awards. The Record Industry Association of America (originally R.I.A.A., now the periodless RIAA) stepped in to offer independently audited and certified ‘official’ awards in place of the common awards made by individual record… Continue Reading the original RIAA gold standard was based on units of one million

moody blue – facts and fallacies about elvis’ final album as a collector’s item

AUGUST 16, 1977, WAS THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL: Elvis Presley died. Very few fans were aware of his deteriorating health and we were unprepared for our own response to his death. Fans were aware of Elvis in general: his latest album, MOODY BLUE, had been released four weeks earlier and was selling better than usual. In the months after his death, his final album became one of his best selling albums ever. Due it being his final album, MOODY BLUE holds a special place in the Elvis canon, despite it’s being a relatively undistinguished album, even by Presley’s flagging efforts… Continue Reading moody blue – facts and fallacies about elvis’ final album as a collector’s item

country music fans were always divided on elvis

IN A RECENT ARTICLE, I broke Elvis fandom down into several distinct groups, or generations. In response, Nondisposablejohnny (the enigmatic overseer of The Round Place In The Middle website) posted a pair of observations in the Comment Section. I started to answer his points in that section, but realized that I had a bit to say on the subjects. Always divided between immediacy and exposition, I opted for the latter and here we are. Aside from addressing Nondisposablejohnny’s (NDJ) points, I get to ramble on about related and even peripheral issues. In “Fifty Generations Of Elvis Fans Can’t Be… Continue Reading country music fans were always divided on elvis

about those electronically reprocessed stereo albums

WHAT IS ELECTRONICALLY REPROCESSED STEREO and why do so many Elvis fans hate it? What is rechanneled stereo and Duophonic stereo and why does everyone else hate them? Before addressing these questions, I want to mention a few things about stereo records. Most people, including music historians and record collectors, simply take stereo for granted—but it has a lengthy and interesting past. In 1957, the stereo long-playing album was introduced to the marketplace by a pair of small independent record companies. In 1958, most of the major companies followed with their own stereo releases. By 1959, the new format was… Continue Reading about those electronically reprocessed stereo albums

fifty generations of elvis fans can’t be wrong

THE TERM “ELVIS FAN” is generally bantered about as if it describes one large group that has been more or less the same for sixty years. There are many generations of fans, from those who fell in love with Elvis the Pelvis in the ’50s, to those who grew up with “the King” through the Jumpsuit Years of the ’70s. Of course there weren’t fifty generations of Elvis fans—that’s just an allusion! 1 As this article is not an attempt at sociology, it simply identifies five basic generations. These generations are not based on age, but when fans discovered… Continue Reading fifty generations of elvis fans can’t be wrong